I went for a nice

I went for a nice walk though Central Park this evening. I came across this very odd guy doing his “prayformance” at the Angel Tunnel/ Bethesda Terrace Arcade. Very talented, very musical, and very strange was he. Anyway, the experience reinforced in me the marvel of New York City. You just never know when you might come across the most bizzar and wonderful thing – in this case “Thoth.”
Check out his website.
comments? e-mail me

I have stopped reading the

I have stopped reading the list from the House of Deputies/House of Bishops listserv, and now the new “forum” ist for the kibitzers. There is just too many posts and the arguments are getting more and more polarized. There have been cries from some who take a more moderate stance (don’t really have a problem with homosexuality, but do not believe now is the time for an openly gay and partnered Bishop in the Anglican Communion) that the liberals are simply throwing them into the AAC pile. The moderates charge the liberals with doing the same thing the conservatives tend to do – falsely lump people into the “enemy” or “evil” category simply because they do not completely agree with their position, and other stuff. Anyway, I think the moderates are right – the liberals categorizes anyone who opposes Gene’s consecration as being part of the AAC, and it is not so.
Lord willing, I heading up to New Hampshire on Sunday. I should have a ticket, but one never knows. The consecration is taking place in an ice-arena! We were told to dress warmly. What is that all about?
I don’t know. This just needs to run its course and be over with. Of course, this is only the beginning, but at least the deed will have been done and everyone can either relax or leave. Get it over with.
Tonight, the Halloween Parade in the Village. Maybe. I am feeling a bit melancholy tonight, so I may just stay in. Too much work to do, besides.
comments? e-mail me

The following was read this

The following was read this morning by Professor DeChamplain in Preaching class with reference to speaking/preaching/communicating. I think it is very appropriate for our current controversies. There is nothing truly new under the sun.

"One of the most enduring illusions is that our current difficulties are abnormal, ought to pass soon, and will be succeeded by an uninterrupted era of tranquility. We expect life to be like the shuttle between Heathrow and Edinburgh, a smooth ride on the whole, interrupted by occasional bouts of turbulence, through which we are advised to fasten our seat belts. In fact, the human reality is the reverse of that. Turbulence is the norm, interrupted by occasional periods of tranquility.
"One reason why people endlessly predict the disintegration of the Anglican Church is because of the prevalence of this tranquillist heresy. The doctrine is that we have departed or fallen from a normative tranquility and that our present troubles are abnormally stimulated by human wickedness and error, whereas it is the other way round. Turbulence and disagreement are the norm, the signs of life, and we should accept them as such. 'The troubles of our proud and angry dust are from eternity and shall not fail,' said Houseman. But job said it too: 'Man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upward.' (Job 5:7).
"Let us spend some time meditating on this claim. Let us look at some of the troubles of our proud and angry dust."
(by: Richard Holloway)

I’ve decided to use my

I’ve decided to use my main weblog (this one) as a repository for everything, and the distribute the items to their own specific blog, if appropriate. Just an FYI.
Thus, concerning the Anglican Communion – the following was read this morning by Professor DeChamplain in Preaching class with reference to speaking/preaching/communicating. I think it is very appropriate for our current controversies. There is nothing truly new under the sun.

"One of the most enduring illusions is that our current difficulties are abnormal, ought to pass soon, and will be succeeded by an uninterrupted era of tranquility. We expect life to be like the shuttle between Heathrow and Edinburgh, a smooth ride on the whole, interrupted by occasional bouts of turbulence, through which we are advised to fasten our seat belts. In fact, the human reality is the reverse of that. Turbulence is the norm, interrupted by occasional periods of tranquility.
"One reason why people endlessly predict the disintegration of the Anglican Church is because of the prevalence of this tranquillist heresy. The doctrine is that we have departed or fallen from a normative tranquility and that our present troubles are abnormally stimulated by human wickedness and error, whereas it is the other way round. Turbulence and disagreement are the norm, the signs of life, and we should accept them as such. 'The troubles of our proud and angry dust are from eternity and shall not fail,' said Houseman. But job said it too: 'Man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upward.' (Job 5:7).
"Let us spend some time meditating on this claim. Let us look at some of the troubles of our proud and angry dust."
(by: Richard Holloway)

comments? e-mail me

I was elected student representative

I was elected student representative to the Board of Trustees a month or so ago. I attended one meeting thus far, but it was atypical because the Board, minus the student reps, went on a retreat after the “official” meeting. Anyway, just so that I don’t offer only my personal opinions on things, we had a meeting of the Middler class in our apartment last night. It was a good meeting – not a “bitch session,” but we did let off a little steam, and then went on to substantive things.
Higher ed. Administration and student services really is my element, which of course makes sense since I’ve been doing that sort of thing for so long, but I am also in my element with regards to religion, politics, and technology. Anyway, doing this caused me to realize that I am coming at this thing from both an administrative perspective and also, for the first time in ten years, from a student perspective. It was just an odd feeling. If I end up back in higher education, I have been reminded what it is like being a student, especially a non-typical student.
comments? e-mail me

This has been a very

This has been a very difficult two weeks. Classes have us all at our wits end. The Anglican Communion drama is still going on and we are all still fit-to-be-tied. All-in-all, things have been better.
There is a large contingent from the seminary going up to Gene Robinson’s consecration. I decided not to go early on, for a variety of reasons. I think I have changed my mind. There are a bunch going up just on Sunday for the consecration and then returning, same day. I’m trying to get a ticket and hopefully I will be able to attend. The type of language coming out of the American Anglican Council convinced me I should go. They are so strident and absolutist, and wrong.
comments? e-mail me

“Some things hurt us; we

“Some things hurt us; we hope they will not happen again; we call them bad. Some things please us; we hope they will happen again; we call them good.” (Thomas & Wondra, Introduction to Theology, p.153) From a quote by Temple, concerning redefining sin in our modern era surrounding the notion of self-centeredness.
comments? e-mail me